More Impressed with Fully Dressed

Eliza-dushkuEliza Dushku. I’ve seen her in the Buffy and Angel series and again in Dollhouse. Why are most of her photographs (posing for publicity) not like this? Here she has elegance and power. But, most female characters/ actresses are posed inelegantly, often with legs open so the focus is not on their face. If men were posed that way it would look obscene or far too cocky (literally).

Not so different from female Doms. Most are shown in tight clothes with a lot of skin and body parts exposed. Meanwhile men show almost no skin. They tend to look mysterious, in command and a little threatening. They don’t look like hookers.

I know someone will have a thing about the use of the word hookers. But, that’s how I feel. If you have a conniption about it, read the blog of someone who agrees with everything you think. Yes men types should stick together. I prefer to be a free thinker. I decide what I think and when I change what I think. You only have that privilege for yourself.

Anyway, I prefer the photos of Eliza fully dressed. My favourite being the full length black dress. eliza-dushkuEliza_Dushku

When Women Carried Swords

Hat pins were not a joke. If women still wore hat pins there would be a hat pin fetish.

Being stuck with a hat pin would not make a good fetish. Too dangerous.

Some of them were 12 inches long, sharp and not used as a medical instrument traditionally.  I’m sure there would be a lot of accidental deaths by hat pin.

On the other hand, they may have been better than pepper spray at keeping the mashers at bay. 

In March 1910, Chicago’s city council ran with that idea, debating an ordinance that would ban hatpins longer than nine inches; any woman caught in violation would be arrested and fined $50. The proceedings were packed with curious spectators, men and women, and acrimonious from the start. “If women care to wear carrots and roosters on their heads, that is a matter for their own concern, but when it comes to wearing swords they must be stopped,” a supporter said. Cries of “Bravo!” from the men; hisses from the women. Nan Davis, there to represent several women’s clubs, asked for permission to address the committee. “If the men of Chicago want to take the hatpins away from us, let them make the streets safe,” she said. “No man has a right to tell me how I shall dress and what I shall wear.”

Despite Davis’ impassioned speech, the ordinance passed by a vote of 68 to 2. Similar laws subsequently passed in several other cities, including Milwaukee, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and New Orleans. Ten thousand miles away, in Sydney,  Australia, sixty women went to jail rather than pay fines for wearing “murderous weapons” in their hats. Even conservative London ladies steadfastly refused to buy hatpin point protectors.

Via smithsonianmag.com